Correct Execution Techniques

The thing with working out is that you can’t just go into it blindly. Sure, you can simply jump on a cardio machine and go at it, but when you’re weightlifting, you need to correctly execute the movement in order to benefit from any given exercise. Wrong movement and execution will get you nowhere and might cause harm, which is why correctly knowing how to execute the exercise is vital.

Every exercise comes with certain instructions since they’re created to train specific muscles. In order to get the most out of each movement, you need to know the correct form and how to ensure that you safely gain all the benefits from the weightlifting program you’re following. Here are some detailed instructions on how to safely and correctly execute a number of common exercises:

  1. Military Press

To work on your shoulders, you should incorporate the military press, which trains all three of your shoulder’s deltoid muscles. It also works out your upper back, your core and triceps and biceps, making it a beneficial move to incorporate into your workout regime. There are two variations of the military press: seated and standing.

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For a seated military press, you’ll want to use a military press station, or if your gym doesn’t have one, you can use a power rack and utility bench or do the standing variation in a squat rack. For the seated variation, place your feet flat on the ground shoulder-width apart. Turn your toes and knees out a bit. Make sure that you’re pressing your heels into the ground and that your upper back and butt are right up against the bench. Grip the bar like a bench press with your back in a neutral position. Take a deep breath in and tighten your glutes and abs before pressing your chest up. Bring the bar down to your clavicle while keeping your elbows tucked under your hands. Tilt your head to let the bar go past your nose and chin while looking forward and not straight up. Don’t arch your back. Once the bar is at your clavicle, raise it up and once it gets past your forehead, move your torso a bit forward and squeeze your glutes. Return back to starting position and continue doing for your desired number of reps. The standing is the same, except that you’re not using a bench.

  1. Pull Ups

Pull ups work your back, biceps and forearms and are pretty challenging to do unassisted. They’re especially hard if you’re just getting started, so don’t feel bad if you can only do a few. In order to do a pull up correctly, try doing a few assisted variations with a chair, workout bands or a partner before doing them on your own. First grab the pull up bar, gripping it shoulder-width apart with your palms down. Just hang there with straight arms and then pull yourself up by pulling your elbows to the floor, but keeping them close. Pull yourself up until your chin passes the bar and then lower yourself down to repeat.

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  1. Dumbbell Row

For a dumbbell row, find a flat bench and then place a dumbbell of your desired weight at each side. You’ll be doing one arm at time, so first place your right leg on top of the bench before bending your body forward at the waist so that your upper body is parallel to the floor. Use your right hand on the other end of the bench for added support. Then with your left hand, pick up one dumbbell on the floor and hold it while keeping your back straight. Your palm should be facing your torso. Then pull the weight straight up to your chest, keeping your arms close to your body. When doing this, squeeze your back muscles until you reach the starting position. Repeat for desired reps before doing the same thing on the other side.

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  1. Dips

To grow your chest and triceps, you’ll want to incorporate dips into your workouts. This body weight exercise can be done on a dip bars or on benches. For the dip bars, grab the bars and jump up, balancing yourself with your elbows locked. Lower your body by bending your arms, while leaning your torso forward a bit. Go down until your shoulders are below your elbows and then lift your body back up at starting position with your arms straight. Make sure that your hands are under your shoulders and that you keep your arms close to your body for proper form.

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      5. Seal Row

The Seal Row is an excellent exercise for training and development of the latissimus dorsi, it also recruits synergically the muscles of the shoulder, forearm and buttocks, giving an important stimulus to the whole body. It gets its name from the fact that, when you try to lift heavier weights on this exercise, your legs will often “flap” up and down behind you like a seal. In this exercise, traction along the sagittal axis allows maximizing the recruitment of this muscle. It is performed by lying on your stomach on a raised bench so that you can insert the barbell or dumbells under it, with a prone grip usually, forming a 90-degree angle at the elbows, you make a pull by bringing the dumbell to touch the bottom of the bench, this exercize almost excludes the uso of lower back muscles and concentrates on upper back, so you can easily integrate it in a weekly schedule where you already do a lot of squats and deadlifts.

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